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Jr World Orienteering Championships July 4-10

JWOC2015logo

The 2015 Junior World Orienteering Championships run July 4 to 10 in Rauland, Norway.

The Canadian team consists of

Pia Blake (Whitehorse)
Emma Sherwood (Calgary)
Emma Waddington (Hamilton)

Alexander Bergstrom (Ottawa)
Trevor Bray (Whitehorse)
Robbie Graham (Ottawa) (injured)
Caelan McLean (Whitehorse)
Jan Erik Naess (Chicago)
Michael Svoboda (Calgary)

Team Leader: Stefan Bergstrom
Coach: Raphael Ferrand

Here’s a few ways to connect with JWOC and the team:

Here’s the schedule:

JWOC2015program

Go Canada Go!

 

Register by July 3rd for Cdn Orienteering Champs before prices increase

COC2015_July3deadline

Register by June 30th for Sass Peepre Ntl Jr Training Camp before prices increase

Sass Peepre 2015 June 30

Coach Profile: Hans Fransson

Hometown Hamilton, ON
Club DontGetLost and OK Njudung (Sweden)
Occupation Teacher

What is your first orienteering memory?
I followed the footsteps of my brother (mostly) and the rest of the family pretty pretty much since day one so I have some vague memories from O-Ringen 1977 but I have some clear visions from the first race I ran on my own. I can still picture one of the control sites and the flag. That was back in 1981

If you could go anywhere in the world to orienteer, where would you go, and why?
The map from WOC in 1985 (Australia) looks pretty cool. I would like to try that terrain.

If you could get orienteering coaching from anyone in the world (dead or alive) who would it be, and why?
Thierry Gueorgiou (TG). I would like him to coach me and we would start from scratch again.

Aside from orienteering, what other sports do you do on a regular basis?
Cross country skiing, floorball, started recently to run one marathon per year and will try to keep that going.

What is your favourite pre-race breakfast/snack?
As long as I get a mouthful of coffee, I will be fine.

Please tell us a bit about your coaching philosophy?
I have mostly coached kids (ARK and at school) and then it is all about having fun. (You still should have fun when you are older because otherwise you won’t be able to allow the hours that are required.) In essence, there are no shortcuts, if your goals are high, the training need to reflect that. The more training you do, the greater chance to do well in a race. TG and Kent Olsson, arguably two of the best technical runners runs/ran on a map 1h/day in average.

Coach Profile: Patrick Goeres

Hometown Winnipeg, MB
Club MOA
Occupation 4th year medical student at the University of Manitoba.

Proudest Orienteering Achievment
Representing Canada is always a very special experience. I was most proud of the first time I qualified for a final in 8th in my heat. Another highlight was finishing my competitive career off with a strong result in the Lausanne Sprint Final.

What is your first orienteering memory?
Going to a local meet in Little Mountain Park, near Winnipeg.

What is your favourite orienteering story or experience?
Traveling to places I never would have discovered otherwise is incredible. Deserts in the US, mountains in Switzerland and tiny parks in Victoria, BC are.

Is there a particular map/area where you could never get tired of orienteering?
Bow Valley in Alberta

If you could go anywhere in the world to orienteer, where would you go, and why?
I’ve got Croatia on the top of my bucket list.

If you could get orienteering coaching from anyone in the world (dead or alive) who would it be, and why?
Ted de St Croix. He always has something wise to say if you listen.

Aside from orienteering, what other sports do you do on a regular basis?
The occasional trail and road running race. Squash for fun.

Please tell us a bit about your coaching philosophy?
Use fundamental training philosophies and principles to educate athletes about what they need to do to become better.

Tell us something that we might not know about you…
I occasionally play the guitar and am working on my Avett Brothers repertoire.

 

Coach Profile: Ross Burnett

Hometown Whitehorse, Yukon
Club YOA
Occupation Yukon Government:
Cabinet Policy Analyst

Proudest orienteering achievements
I competed for Canada at four WOCs (83, 85, 87, 89) and numerous World Cups; survived Indian Harbour (NS) in 1984; on the Relay team which finished 9th at WOC in 1987; won the COC in 1987 and 1995 (Short), 21st in a World Cup Race in Tasmania in 1988; organized the first Yukon Championships in 1989.

What is your first orienteering memory?
My first orienteering memory is of the first orienteering event I did which was on snowshoes – a score-O format on Hollyburn Mountain in Vancouver’s North Shore in January 1976.

What is your favourite orienteering story or experience?
My favourite orienteering story is not my story at all – it is the story of Thierry Gueorgiou, Anders Nordberg and Michal Smola who gave up sure medals in the 2009 WOC relay to help injured orienteer Martin Johansson.

Is there a particular map/area where you could never get tired of orienteering?
I would never get tired of orienteering at Carcross Desert, Yukon.

If you could go anywhere in the world to orienteer, where would you go, and why?
If I could go anywhere to orienteer it would be to the countries east of the Adriatic (Croatia etc.) to check out the karst and rock terrain.

If you could get orienteering coaching from anyone in the world (dead or alive) who would it be, and why?
I would love to be coached by Thierry Gueorgiou because I would like to hear him describe in person how he does what he does and about his training techniques.

Aside from orienteering, what other sports do you do on a regular basis?
Besides orienteering I also do cross country skiing, and hiking.

Please tell us a bit about your coaching philosophy?
My coaching philosophy is essentially that we need to spend more time coaching the basics, and teaching athletes to have the discipline to apply techniques and make decisions in a conscious fashion.

Tell us something that we might not know about you…
Something people might not know about me is that I spent over three months traveling in Africa in 1982-83.

Athlete Profile: Brian May

brianmay_2

Born
Hometown Cornerbrook, NL
Currently living Salmon Arm, BC
Club Sage Orienteering
Occupation Professor, Okanagan College
Training log
Attackpoint
Twitter @brianmay1867

Please list your best and proudest orienteering achievements to date.
North American Champion (1998, 2002, 2008, 2014)
Canadian Champion (2011)
WOC participant (1993, 1997, 2003, 2004)

What is your first orienteering memory?
Orienteering at West Haven summer camp in Pasadena, Newfoundland

What is your favourite orienteering story or experience?
Trips to far-flung places all over the world.  Coolest orienteering experience was crossing between East and West Berlin during JWOC 1991 just two years after the Berlin Wall came down.

Is there a particular map/area where you could never get tired of orienteering?
Harriman State Park in the spring and fall.  Open woods, great visibility and tough, technical terrain.

If you could go anywhere in the world to orienteer, where would you go, and why?
Swiss Alps – fantastic views and fun, challenging terrain.

If you could get orienteering coaching from anyone in the world (dead or alive) who would it be, and why?
Thierry Gueorgiou – The man is a legend and a master of technical middle-distance orienteering.

Aside from orienteering, what other sports do you do on a regular basis?
Cross country skiing and Mountain biking.
 
What is your favourite pre-race breakfast/snack?
Morning race – cereal.  Afternoon race – pancakes.

Please tell us a bit about your coaching philosophy?
Focus on the tasks at hand and let the results come as they may.  Enjoy the journey, rather than worrying about the destination.

Tell us something that we might not know about you…
I last ran in Scotland 28 years ago!

Emily Kemp featured at IOF's Athlete of the Month

emilykemp_WOC2014Long

The International Orienteering Federation features an athlete each month and Canada’s own Emily Kemp is currently featured. Read the IOF’s profile of and interview with Emily here.

Coaches and Team Leaders to WOC and JWOC 2015

COACHES AND TEAM LEADERS TO WOC AND JWOC 2015

The High Performance Committee is pleased to confirm that Raphael Ferrand will be coaching Team Canada at both the Junior World Orienteering Championships (JWOC) and the World Orienteering Championships (WOC) this year. Raphael coached our Canadian JWOC team last year. We are thrilled to have Raphael working with us again. We are also pleased to have veteran team leaders working with the WOC and JWOC teams again this year. Stefan Bergstrom (Ottawa) is the team leader for the JWOC team and Meghan Rance (Vancouver / Hamilton) is the team leader for the 2015 WOC team.

Athletes' Rep Election Process

2015 Athlete Representative Election Process

Background
In 2008 the position of Athlete Representative was created. The athlete representative sits on both the High Performance Committee (HPC) and the Orienteering Canada Board of Directors as a full voting member with a mandate to look after the interests of high performance athletes.
The position was initially held by Brent Langbakk, current High Performance Director, and then Patrick Goeres and now Jeff Teutsch whose term is ending this summer. We are looking for an athlete who is, or has been within the last four years, a member of the Junior or Senior National Team, is interested in this position and meets the eligibility requirements.

Term of the Athlete Representative
The elected individual will serve a 3-year term starting immediately after the 2015 Orienteering Canada Annual General Meeting (AGM). After the 2015 Orienteering Canada AGM, the Athlete Rep will be a voting member of the Orienteering Canada Board of Directors and Orienteering Canada’s official representative to Athletes CAN, the Association of National Team Athletes.

Responsibility of the Athlete Representative
The representative is expected to, among other things:

  • represent the interests of the high performance athletes in any Board discussions that affect high performance training, competition, hosting and/or the ability of the athletes to perform
  • be the liaison between high performance athletes and the Board
  • ensure that communication takes place between high performance athletes regarding issues of interest and impact to the high performance program
  • be a member of the High Performance Committee (HPC)
  • fulfill the duties of a Orienteering Canada board member
  • be the Orienteering Canada Athletes’ Rep to AthletesCAN including attending the annual AthletesCAN Forum (travel and accommodation expenses are paid for), which is usually held in the fall.

The job description is available on www.orienteering.ca. (most of the items aren’t as scary as they sound ;) – Jeff)

Who elects the Athlete Representative?
In 2014 a new Canadian Not For Profit Act was implemented which governs what not for profit organizations can and cannot do. In order to comply with this act the Athlete Rep election process is somewhat convoluted. Instead of electing someone directly to the board of directors, junior and senior national team members will elect a National Senior and Junior Team Member Delegate (“The Delegate”) to a special class of Orienteering Canada membership prior to Orienteering Canada’s Annual General Meeting (AGM). The Delegate then elects an athlete rep at the AGM. It is understood that The Delegate will elect themselves to the position of athlete rep.

For the purposes of electing The Delegate by junior and senior national team members, and given the timing of the election and the fact that the 2015 WOC team has not been finalized and the 2015 JWOC team has been finalized, the athletes eligible to vote are:
2014 WOC team (Emily Kemp, Louise Oram, Tori Owen, Robbie Anderson, Eric Kemp, Will Critchley, Damian Konotopetz)
2015 JWOC team (Pia Blake, Emma Sherwood, Emma Waddington, Alexander Bergstrom, Trevor Bray, Robbie Graham, Caelan McLean, Jan Erik Naess, Michael Svoboda)

Who is eligible to be the Athlete Representative?
To be eligible to be the athlete representative the individual must be representing Canada as a team member at the Junior World or World Orienteering Championships this year (2015) or have done so within the past four years. The individual does not have to be a current member of the High Performance Program. The individual must be eighteen years of age or older as well as other requirements outlined in the Orienteering Canada by-laws (section 2.02).

Nomination process
The call for nomination will be circulated via email and web to the Canadian orienteering community. Nominations for the position must be sent to Orienteering Canada (by email to hpp@orienteering.ca) by June 19, 2015. Individuals can nominate themselves or someone else can nominate an individual with his/her prior approval.
All nominees will have the opportunity to submit answers (by June 19, 2015 to hpp@orienteering.ca) to the following questions:
1. Why do you wish to run for The Delegate position (with the intent of becoming the Athlete Representative)? (answer not to exceed 250 words)
2. What is your vision for elite orienteering in Canada? (answer not to exceed 250 words)

Election process
By June 19th, 2015 a representative of the HPC will send by email the list of nominated athletes and their responses to the above questions to all those eligible to vote.

Voting will be closed at June 26th, 2015, 11:59pm MST by replying by email with the name of the desired Delegate. The email is to be sent to the two Orienteering Canada officials acting as proctors (the email addresses of the proctors will be sent with the voting information). The elected individual will be announced by June 28, 2015.

This document is available here as a pdf.

This document was approved by the High Performance Committee on June 2, 2015