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Orienteering Canada posts Management Plan for COVID-19 risks

See the Orienteering Canada COVID-19 page <www.orienteering.ca/resources/covid-19> for the latest news regarding Orienteering Canada’s Management Plan for COVID-19 risks.

Athlete Profile: Will Critchley

Born1984
HometownEdmonton, AB
Currently LivingJyväskylä, Finland
OccupationSport Psychology Coach,
Intellectual Property Manager
Training LogStrava
Twitter@I_Will_Perform

If you had one tip for young orienteers, what would it be?
The most interesting thing I’ve learned in psychology, from educational psychology, is to spend time “thinking about thinking”. Too often people attribute mental abilities to being naturally good at something, which I concluded is wrong. Its just a matter of those people having figured out how to organize the information they receive and utilize it in an effective matter. It is why there are people that can memorize pi to hundreds of digits. They have come up with strategies to effectively memorize and recall the information. They have structured their thinking in a meaningful way. So, when it comes to orienteering, think about your process, what information do you need? What information do you need to store? How do you make it meaningful and effective for your strategies? Every map might be different, but you can start with identifying in every terrain what are the important features, how do you make them stand out to you, in the terrain and on the map?

What would a typical week of training look like for you (at a part of the season of your choosing)?
3 intensity sessions per week, Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. Filler training the rest of the week, consisting of easy volume, or a strength workout twice a week. Saturdays and Sundays are ideally days to “double down”, or to do a longer workout on Sunday. This is a fairly standard training system for people who work full-time.


Will is a member of Orienteering Canada’s 2020 High Performance Program.

Athlete Profile: Robert Graham

Born1996
HometownOttawa, ON
Currently LivingOttawa, ON
ClubOrienteering Ottawa
Occupation Software Developer
Training LogAttackpoint
Twitter@thekilograham
Instagram

How did you first get involved in orienteering? 
My parents were heavily involved in the sport (both national team members) so they dragged me out to our local Sunday meets, occasionally against my will ;). My first orienteering event I was 3 weeks old and my mother carried me around the novice course in Gatineau park.

What would a typical week of training look like for you (at a part of the season of your choosing)?
I start the week off in the gym with a lower body workout, deadlift is my favourite. On Tuesday I do a light cardio activity like running, biking, or cross-country skiing. Wednesday morning, I do some conditioning, strengthening little muscles used for stabilization, balance, and injury prevention. In the evening our club has a local running group that always does some fun and interesting workouts. Thursday is another day of light cardio. Friday I’m back in the gym this time for upper body (for cross country skiing but also to have a little more power when I’m out in the woods). Weekends I’m either away at races or if not, I’ll do some long activities. Again biking, skiing, running, or orienteering, usually up in Gatineau Park. And all throughout the week I look at maps, old courses, do some visualization, and mediation to stay sharp. I find this is great to do in the winter, so come the orienteering season I can get right into the swing of things.


Robert is a member of Orienteering Canada’s 2020 High Performance Program.

Athlete Profile: Tomas Graham

Born1998
HometownOttawa, ON
Currently Living Ottawa, ON
ClubOrienteering Ottawa
Occupation Student
Training LogAttackpoint
Twitter@tomastommytom
Instagram@tomasnotthomas

How did you first get involved in orienteering? 
My parents were both very involved in the sport, locally and internationally. They sent me out into the forest as soon as I could walk! I didn’t immediately fall in love, it actually took quite a while, but I eventually did. I owe everything to them for getting me involved in the sport.

If you had one tip for young orienteers, what would it be?
Navigation always comes first! The best orienteers always figure out where they need to go and what to look for before they run. Focus on the map/terrain and your speed will come naturally.

What would a typical week of training look like for you (at a part of the season of your choosing)?
At the height of my training, I’m doing actual orienteering maybe twice or thrice a week. On top of that I’ll go on 2 to 3 runs (distance, intervals, hills, etc.). I also do my best to squeeze in some strength/core and some map-reading in between.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? 
It may sound silly, but I almost don’t treat it as a race, but rather a training session. The second you start worrying about your position or about winning, you start to lose focus on your navigation and mistakes can be made. When you adopt the training session mentality (i.e. thinking solely about navigation and tactics), you can concentrate better on executing proper orienteering skills which leads to a good performance.

What is your big life orienteering goal?
Be involved in the sport for as long as possible. It’s so inspiring to see people well into their 90s participate in the sport. Even when I pass my prime, as long as my legs and brain work, I’ll be orienteering!


Tomas is a member of Orienteering Canada’s 2020 High Performance Program.

Athlete Profile: Michael Kondro

Born1993
HometownCalgary, AB
Currently LivingCalgary, AB
Club FWOC

How did you first get involved in orienteering? 
Damian Konotopetz got me into it as we were teammates on the Varsity track and field team at U of C.

If you had one tip for young orienteers, what would it be?
Have fun. Running and training is easier when you enjoy it.

What would a typical week of training look like for you (at a part of the season of your choosing)?
A typical week of training involves morning short runs, afternoon runs plus 2 track workouts a week, one long run / tempo and 1 – 2 orienteering workouts plus training sessions, ontop of work, sleep and downtime with friends.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? 
I create a playlist of music that gets me pumped up and visualize how I want the race to go.

What is your big life orienteering goal?
Race at WOC


Michael is a member of Orienteering Canada’s 2020 High Performance Program.

Athlete Profile: Damian Konotopetz

Born1990
HometownWinnipeg, MB
Currently LivingCalgary, AB
ClubCoureurs de Bois
FWOC
Training LogAttackpoint

Damian is a member of Orienteering Canada’s 2020 High Performance Program.

Athlete Profile: Christian Michelsen

Born1999
HometownDundas, ON
Currently LivingVaxjo, Sweden
ClubDontgetlost
Vaxjo OK
OccupationStudent
Training LogAttackpoint

How did you first get involved in orienteering? 
I began running with Adventure running kids when I was 13 or 14. I started orienteering with the program and kept with it.

What would a typical week of training look like for you (at a part of the season of your choosing)?
Generally about 3 harder sessions a week, maybe 2 running intervals, and another orienteering. About 9-10 hours of running and then another couple hours of cycling or strength

How do you normally prepare for an important race? 
For any races that I’m taking fairly seriously, I’ll find a map of the terrain to get an idea of the challenges I’ll be facing. Other than that I just try to get a good sleep the night before and breakfast in the morning. Obviously, the more important the race the more time I put into preparing.

What is your big life orienteering goal?
My ‘elite’ big life orienteering goal would be to just generally be in the group of top orienteers. If I get there I’m happy. I just like orienteering, and have aspirations to be good, but no clear goals. In the long term, just really enjoy the sport.


Christian is a member of Orienteering Canada’s 2020 High Performance Program.

Athlete Profile: Jan Erik Naess

Born1998
HometownMississauga, ON
Currently LivingCalgary, AB
ClubFWOC
OccupationSOGO junior coach and studying Geomatics Engineering
Instagram@janerikna
BlogBlog

How did you first get involved in orienteering? 
Orienteering has been in our family for two generations now. I was dragged out to it until I finally learned to love it after attending a Sasse Peepre camp in 2014. Since then it has taken over and driven me forward in life!

If you had one tip for young orienteers, what would it be?
Go to the biggest races you can get to. You will start to see how incredible people can become at orienteering and after you get to know them a bit you will realize that you too can become just as good.

What would a typical week of training look like for you (at a part of the season of your choosing)?
Race season is during the summer and is sporadically constructed around miniature peaks for races. I have a base training for the rest of the months and during that time I run three times a week with my cross country team, on Saturdays I am either coaching or training orienteering and every couple of weeks have a Cross Country or Track race to run!

How do you normally prepare for an important race? 
For the big races, preparation starts as soon as I decide I will race it. I get myself out into relevant terrain and, much like how your body can learn soccer moves, I try to have my body learn to run through that terrain. I start doing route analysis and learn the best ways to run which can vary throughout a race depending on my mental and physical fatigue. And then everything is pieced together with mental prep, before I go to the month before my race I visualize a specific piece of the race. Once the race comes around I let myself go and enjoy it.

What is your big life orienteering goal?
I have two goals, for myself, I dream of setting national records in each and every orienteering discipline. I want to do this with a team, bringing each other along in a persevering quest for perfection. Secondly, I would like to enable others to have wonderful life experiences similar to those that orienteering gave me. Therefore, I would like to continue doing more and more coaching of aspiring juniors, helping them reach their goals and find direction in what they love.


Jan Erik is a member of Orienteering Canada’s 2020 High Performance Program.

Athlete Profile: Graeme Rennie

Born1991
HometownNorth Vancouver, BC
Currently LivingVancouver, BC
ClubGVOC
OccupationComputer Engineer
Training LogAttackpoint

How did you first get involved in orienteering? 
As a kid with my family.

If you had one tip for young orienteers, what would it be?
Stay positive. Every great orienteerer has their own long list of embarrassing mistakes and botched races.

What would a typical week of training look like for you (at a part of the season of your choosing)?
1 WET Orienteering Training, 2 track interval sessions, 1 gym strength session, 2 regular runs and 1 long run

How do you normally prepare for an important race? 
Relax! Eat lots, sleep well.

What is your big life orienteering goal?
Run in as many big events and cool countries as possible.


Graeme is a member of Orienteering Canada’s 2020 High Performance Program.

Athlete Profile: Michael Svoboda

Born1999
HometownCalgary, AB
Currently LivingCalgary, AB
Club FWOC
OccupationStudent
Training LogAttackpoint

If you had one tip for young orienteers, what would it be?
Start as early as possible, and join a track team. Do Orienteering for fun until you’re bored, then set some performance goals and strive towards them.

What would a typical week of training look like for you (at a part of the season of your choosing)?

Monday: Rest, 5km
Tuesday: 6x 1km intervals + AM jog (4:00 pace), 11km + 5
Wednesday 4min x 8 (4:30pace) MRU Sprintervals Recovery + AM jog, 12km + 5
Thursday: 5x 2km intervals + AM jog, 12km + 5
Friday: Long (17km@5:00pace) run, recovery 17.5km
Saturday: 30min (4:30pace) Orienteering Recovery + 3x Hill intervals, 12km
Sunday: 15min tempo – threshold pace + PM jog, 13km


Michael is a member of Orienteering Canada’s 2020 High Performance Program.