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Athlete Profile: Adam Woods

Born1994
HometownBurnaby, BC
Currently LivingCoquitlam, BC
ClubGVOC
OccupationSoftware Developer
Training LogAttackpoint
Twitter@a_runwoodsrun

How did you first get involved in orienteering?
I was first introduced to orienteering when I was in grade school; My parents saw an orienteering event in the city’s activity guide and decided to try it out. I biked behind my father as he navigated – I have strong memories of taking a few “shortcuts” through the bush that definitely didn’t save us any time. Unfortunately, the person putting on these events stopped after 2 summers, and I didn’t discover the existence of the Greater Vancouver Orienteering Club until I was in Grade 10.

If you had one tip for a younger orienteer, what would it be?
The best way to maximize enjoyment while orienteering is to decide what you want to get out of each orienteering course. Some of the time the goal will be to learn, other times it will be to “have fun” and at big races your goal might be “to win”. The goal you have will determine the types of route choices you take + the type of experience you have. You can choose to take more inefficient routes because they are fun or because they will be better training. You get to decide what kind of experience you have when you’re out on a course!


Adam is a member of Orienteering Canada’s 2020 High Performance Program.

Athlete Profile: Pia Blake

Born1996
HometownWhitehorse, YT
Currently Living Lund, Sweden
ClubYOA
Lunds OK
OccupationStudent
Training LogAttackpoint

How did you first get involved in orienteering?
I was first introduced to orienteering by my parents and would often take my stuffed animals for strolls in the woods, preferring the map reading component to the running. As I got older, I realized that I needed to push myself physically as well as mentally and so began training with goals for the COCs, NACOs, and eventually JWOC and WOC in mind.

What is your big life orienteering goal?
I would like to remain active in orienteering and contributing to the sport for life. I have gotten to much out of coaches and parents in this orienteering community and would like to give forward to the next generation.


Pia is a member of Orienteering Canada’s 2020 High Performance Program.

Athlete Profile: Rachel May

Born1999
HometownSalmon Arm, BC
Currently Living Kelowna, BC
ClubSAGE
OccupationStudent
Training LogAttackpoint
Instagram@rachelhmay

How did you first get involved in orienteering?
I got involved in orienteering as young kid by being taken along with my parents to orienteering races.

If you had one tip for young orienteers, what would it be?
My tip for young orienteers would be to just have fun while orienteering.

What would a typical week of training look like for you (at a part of the season of your choosing)?
A typical week of training for me during the school year, would have a mix of running and going to the gym sessions along with maybe an on-map training session as allowable by my course load.

How do you normally prepare for an important race?
To prepare for an important race I make sure that I am well rested and that I do a good physical and mental warm-up before the race.

What is your big life orienteering goal?
My big life orienteering goal is to remain active and in the sport of orienteering for life.


Rachel is a member of Orienteering Canada’s 2020 High Performance Program.

Athlete Profile: Emma Sherwood

Born1997
HometownCalgary, AB
Currently LivingCalgary, AB
ClubFWOC
Occupation Student
Training LogAttackpoint
Instagram@emma_sherwood_02

If you had one tip for young orienteers, what would it be?
Take all the opportunities you can to get lots of different orienteering experience. This would include getting out on as many different maps in as many different types of terrain as possible, so you’re able to adapt to and have strategies for many different types of terrain. Also, try to get coached by many different people as some may have suggestions that work really well for you. Getting more experience in higher level competition can also be quite beneficial, and fun

How do you normally prepare for an important race?
There are several different preparation steps I do at different time intervals before a race. Long before the event, I plan my physical training so as to peak for the specific race. I also try to study any old maps of the area, and practice making courses and considering route choices on them. Closer to the race, I train on terrain similar to that of the race area. This is to get used to the terrain, the way it is mapped, and which navigation strategies are best for it.

The day before and the morning of the race, I make sure I get enough sleep, that I’m hydrated, and that I eat a good breakfast (for me this is normally cereal, water and two slices of toast). I have a normal warm-up routine before my race, involving dynamic stretching, running, and ideally a warm-up map: in addition to physical warm-up, I find mental/technical warm-up very important. Finally, on the way to the start I remind myself of the three brief things I’m planning on focusing on during my race. I would have already prepared these based on the training I did in similar terrain and my strengths and weaknesses at the time.


Emma is a member of Orienteering Canada’s 2020 High Performance Program.

Athlete Profile: Emma Waddington

Born1998
HometownHamilton, ON
Currently LivingHamilton, ON
ClubDontgetlost
Helsingin Suunnistajat
OccupationAdventure Running Kids Schools Instructor
Training LogAttackpoint
Twitter@_emmawaddington
Instagram@emma__waddington
BlogBlog
Personal SponsorsEndurance Tap
NVii Sport
DK Orthotic Solutions

How did you first get involved in orienteering?
When my family was living in Sweden in 2006, I was basically forced to start learning from my dad. I started doing some of the kid’s courses in the local club OK Linne. When we came back to Canada, my dad used to make me attend events when I was younger, but I didn’t really enjoy it too much since nobody there was my age. Then, Dontgetlost started our Adventure Running Kids program, and I started to really enjoy the sport since there were so many friends to train with! This then inspired me to join the national team and I’ve been on it ever since

What would a typical week of training look like for you (at a part of the season of your choosing)?
During the months prior to a large event (usually in the spring before summer racing, or during fall cross country season), my week consists of: 2 sessions of strength training a week, plus 1 session of core a week. In the racing months my lifting sessions are a bit lighter in weight but with more endurance focus, as opposed to heavy/shorter lifts in the winter base training months. These lifts are usually after a 30-45 minute recovery run (or cross-training) with strides. My week will also have 2-3 interval workouts a week. One will be more tempo-based usually with hills, another will be longer intervals with bigger rest, and a third with shorter intervals and little rest. On the weekend I will do a long run (or bike) of 80-100 minutes, and finally a rest day with lots of stretching.

If you had one tip for young orienteers, what would it be?
HAVE FUN!!!!

What is your big life orienteering goal?
If I can make it to another WUOC during my educational career, my goal is to medal in the sprint race!


Emma is a member of Orienteering Canada’s 2020 High Performance Program.

Athlete Profile: Graeme Farrand

Born2000
HometownHamilton, ON
Currently Living Waterloo, ON
ClubDontgetlost
OccupationStudent
Training LogAttackpoint
Instagram@instagramfarrand

How did you first get involved in orienteering? 
First started in Don’t Get Lost’s Adventure Running Kids program. I really enjoyed the orienteering it introduced me to and I progressively started to more of it and travelling for races. In 2016 I went to Swiss O Week with my family and ended up hanging out with that years Junior Team a bunch which got me interested in being more competitive and serious about orienteering.

How do you normally prepare for an important race?
In the preceding weeks or months to the race I will go over all the race details available as well as study the area on Google maps and any old maps I can find online. When it gets closer to the race I write the 2-3 process goals I want to focus on in the race.


Graeme is a member of Orienteering Canada’s 2020 High Performance Program.

Athlete Profile: Isak Fransson

Born2003
HometownHamilton, ON
Currently LivingHamilton, ON
ClubDontgetlost
OK Njudung
OccupationStudent
Training LogAttackpoint
Strava
Instagram@isak.fransson

How did you first get involved in orienteering?
My dad introduced me to orienteering at a young age because he is a big orienteer. He took me to a couple races and I really enjoyed it. Ever since we have been traveling to Sweden over the summer and I try to fit in as many races in as I can.

If you had one tip for young orienteers, what would it be?
Try and get as many orienteering controls as you can. That means going to as many trainings and races as possible. Do not forget to have fun!


Isak is a member of Orienteering Canada’s 2020 High Performance Program.

Athlete Profile: Alec LeHelloco

Born2004
HometownOttawa, ON
Currently Living Paris, France
ClubOrienteering Ottawa
OccupationStudent

How did you first get involved in orienteering?
When I was 10 years old, I was living in Ottawa, and my parents bought a house in a new neighbourhood. Soon after we moved in, I met with my neighbour. The man was very interesting, and he explained to my family what orienteering is. In fact, he was very much involved with the Ottawa orienteering club and it did not take long for my family to join one of the meets that get organized on Sunday mornings. For the first time I ran, I was with my parents, we took a course that probably was a bit over our totally beginner level, and we got quite lost. And I loved it! Since then my neighbour showed me maps, and explained lots of things to me during our “driveway discussions”. And he even gave me some really nice orienteering maps, which I still have. Since then I never stopped orienteering, even after I moved out of Ottawa, and I will certainly never forget Brian Graham, the man who made me love maps, love running in the woods, and love orienteering.

What is your big life orienteering goal?
My main goal as an orienteering competitor is to someday represent Canada at the WOC (World Orienteering Championships). To achieve this objective I want to train and keep progressing over the next 6 years. But my bigger life goal in orienteering is to practice this wonderful sport during my whole life, for as long as I can run or walk really, and keep enjoying navigating through the beautiful forests of our Planet.


Alec is a member of Orienteering Canada’s 2020 High Performance Program.

Athlete Profile: Thomas Lindale

Born2001
HometownOttawa, ON
Currently LivingOttawa, ON
ClubOrienteering Ottawa
OccupationStudent
Training LogAttackpoint
Instagram@tom_lindale

If you had one tip for young orienteers, what would it be?

Everyone makes mistakes! When this happens (in a local meet or at Nationals), it’s important to reflect on it and build a plan to correct whatever caused it into your training program. This way, you’ll be able to learn, and have a stronger race next time.

How do you normally prepare for an important race?
When preparing for an important race, I keep it in mind while training for the months/weeks leading up to the event. In the weeks leading up to the event, I’ll intensify my training to make sure I’m in top physical condition. The week of the event, I’ll continue training, but at a level that won’t make me tired or sore for the race on the upcoming weekend. The day of the race, I always have a solid breakfast of oatmeal and fruit, and I always make sure that I read the race bulletin cover to cover.


Thomas is a member of Orienteering Canada’s 2020 High Performance Program.


Athlete Profile: Andrew McLaren

Born2003
HometownCalgary, AB
Currently LivingCalgary, AB
ClubFWOC
OccupationSogo Level 1 and 2 coach
Training LogAttackpoint
Instagram@andrew_j_mclaren

How did you first get involved in orienteering?
I enjoyed hiking and trail running and many other outdoor activities when I was younger. One day my dad suggested that I try orienteering, so did Sogo level 2 for a session the fall. The next fall I decided I enjoyed it alot so I moved up to Sogo level 3, from here I got introduced to the more competitive side of orienteering and loved it.

What is your big life orienteering goal?
At this time my largest goal in orienteering is to go to JWOC in the summer of 2021 in Portugal. I would say my biggest goal is to go to the WOC, however I’m not sure how much I’ll be able to keep up my orienteering training depending on where I go to university and whether or not that place has an orienteering club nearby or not.


Andrew is a member of Orienteering Canada’s 2020 High Performance Program.