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2021 Senior National Team

Christian Michelsen

Year of Birth: 1999Club: Dontgetlost, Växjö OK
Hometown: Hamilton, ONCurrently Living: Växjö, Sweden
Occupation: StudentTraining Log

How did you first get involved in orienteering? Through DONTGETLOST’s youth program Adventure Running Kids.

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? It is always helpful to make your start on time.

What would a typical week of training look like for you? I am currently recovering from breaking(?) my toe orienteering, but if that wasn’t the case I would be getting my running/orienteering up to 10-11 hours a week at this point in the winter. This would include a few harder orienteering or running sessions, plus ideally strength 3 times a week.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? Well generally it has just been to train, study relevant maps, and taper a bit heading into the races. My specific preparations for major events hasn’t been the greatest in the past so that is something I need to improve on.

What is your big life orienteering goal? To keep training, enjoying the sport, and get to a level where I am actually competing at WOC, not just attending.


Damian Konotopetz

Year of Birth: 1990Club: Coureurs de Bois/ FWOC
Hometown: Winnipeg, MBCurrently Living: Calgary, AB
Occupation: EntrepreneurTraining Log
Twitter @dkonotopetzInstagram @damiankonotopetz
BlogPersonal Sponsors: Nuun Hydration

How did you first get involved in orienteering? From my parents.

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? Running speed is just as important as orienteering technique.

What would a typical week of training look like for you? Two interval trainings, one tempo, one long run, one moderate run, and one easy run. Two weights sessions and five core sessions.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? A few fast training and lots of rest.

What is your big life orienteering goal? Top 20 in the WOC Sprint


Emma Waddington

Year of Birth: 1998Club: Dontgetlost
Hometown: Hamilton, ONCurrently Living: Hamilton/Parry Sound, ON
Occupation: Orienteering Coach/InstructorTraining Log
Strava Instagram @emma__waddington
Blog Personal Sponsors: Nuun Hydration, Endurance Tap, NVii Sport, DK Orthotic Solutions
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How did you first get involved in orienteering? I got involved through my family, which mostly involved my dad dragging me out to events when I was little. I didn’t enjoy being out there too much, until Dontgetlost started the Adventure Running Kids program. Through my years of ARK, I made new friends and made so many fun memories, both of which encouraged me to join the National Team!

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? Being able to find the fun in any training or race is what is most important for development. On top of that, everything is about experience! Each “bad” race, or mistake that you make is a learning opportunity to improve for next time.

What would a typical week of training look like for you? Monday: Recovery run with strides and strength session. Tuesday: Interval workout. Wednesday: Recovery run or cross train, and strength session. Thursday: Tempo workout with hills. Friday: Recovery run with strides and strength session. Saturday: Long run with map, or long orienteering session. Sunday: REST and RECOVER! (I take this very seriously! Resting in training!) I try to include some map study whenever I can, if I can’t get on actual maps.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? On the night before the race, I’ll write out my race plan and schedule to keep myself organized in the morning, and visualize the whole day before I go to bed. Visualizing a bunch of scenarios helps me to prepare for whatever the day may hold and reduced potential surprises. I try not to get too in my head, but rather find a balance between staying positive and being deep in the zone.

What is your big life orienteering goal? A personal goal would be to place in the top 15 in an individual race at WOC. A more global goal is to continue to help develop young female athletes in this sport.


Jan Erik Naess

Year of Birth: 1998Club: FWOC, CAOC, Fossum IF
Hometown: Mississauga, ONCurrently Living: Calgary, AB
Occupation: StudentTraining Log
Instagram @janerikna

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? Make as many mistakes as you can, as soon as you can. It’s your mistakes that teach you about your physical and mental boundaries. In my opinion when you’re learning to orienteer you should be much more proud of a race with 75% awesome splits and 25% terrible ones than a race that is filled with splits that you know you could have run faster.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? I try to become well acquainted with the terrain long before the actual race. Sometimes this means watching others’ GoPro footage, viewing GPS tracks of competitors or starting to visualize myself running in the terrain. If possible, I try and do a couple of training camps in neighbouring terrain and to have a short taper before the race so that my mind and body are ready to perform at their best.


Robert Graham

Year of Birth: 1996Club: OOC
Hometown: Ottawa, ONCurrently Living: Ottawa, ON
Occupation: Software DeveloperTraining Log
Twitter @thekilograhamInstagram @robbiejaroslav

How did you first get involved in orienteering? Both my parents were heavily involved in the sport so they brought me out to events when I was young. I got interested in the competitive side during the 2012 Sass Peepree Camp after listening to the national team’s experience at JWOC in Slovakia.

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? Consistency and variety should be at the base of your training.

What would a typical week of training look like for you? I incorporate a lot of cross training into my routine to keep myself injury free. My week usually consists of orienteering, running, cycling, cross country skiing, and strength training. I also like to do some mental training either by studying old maps or running courses on Catching Features.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? Technical training in similar areas if possible, study old maps, adjust my workouts to prepare myself for the type of terrain.

What is your big life orienteering goal? Podium at the North American Champs.


Philipe Turcanu

Year of Birth: 2000Club: OOC
Hometown: Ottawa, ONCurrently Living: Ottawa/Guelph, ON
Occupation: StudentTraining Log
Instagram @lipy.turca

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? Train hard but have fun. If you aren’t having fun in sport you are not doing it the right way.

What would a typical week of training look like for you? Winter training week! These weeks are always high volume for me filled with plenty of kilometers on the roads, not too much in the woods because of the snow. Monday: Wake up at 7am, eat well and get ready for my first workout that is 12km of running in the woods. No extensive navigation, the idea is to get efficient in the woods. The afternoon is my first higher intensity workout of 3000m interval repeats. Tuesday: Wake up is 6am, light food since I am going into a hard 10km tempo at a very fast pace followed immediately by 5km of jogging to loosen up the legs and to flush them out. Afterwards in the evening, looking at a Leg Strength circuit that lasts about 45-60mins. Wednesday: 7am wake up, 9am is my first Orienteering course of the week. About 10-12km in length and not a very fast pace. In the afternoon is a very easy 10km on the roads used as an active recovery. After this run, a core routine that lasts 45-60mins. Thursday: 6am wake up and at 7am, I am on the roads, this time for a threshold run of 20-30km depending on my progression. I like to add as much versatility to terrain so that I run in trails, roads, paths, hills etc. during this run. The rest of the day is off except for the evening where I have the same Leg strength routine from Tuesday. Friday: 7am wake up, 9am is my second Orienteering course OR trail run. About 10-12km in length and not a very fast pace. In the afternoon is a very easy 10km on the roads used as an active recovery. Saturday: This is my sleep in day and I usually wake up around 9am starting the day off with a very easy 10km. The afternoon is my very fast sprint like workout of either 400 or 600m repeats. I usually do this one on the track but I love doing it on my school’s campus and zigzagging through buildings. Sunday: My day off, I spend it walking my dog, stretching and catching up on either sleep or work :)

What is your big life orienteering goal? My big life goal in Orienteering is to become a world champion in all disciplines. My love and dedication is why I believe I can do it and I will follow my dream all the way!

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