Archives

A sample text widget

Etiam pulvinar consectetur dolor sed malesuada. Ut convallis euismod dolor nec pretium. Nunc ut tristique massa.

Nam sodales mi vitae dolor ullamcorper et vulputate enim accumsan. Morbi orci magna, tincidunt vitae molestie nec, molestie at mi. Nulla nulla lorem, suscipit in posuere in, interdum non magna.

2021 Senior National Team

Christian Michelsen

Year of Birth: 1999Club: Dontgetlost, Växjö OK
Hometown: Hamilton, ONCurrently Living: Växjö, Sweden
Occupation: StudentTraining Log

How did you first get involved in orienteering? Through DONTGETLOST’s youth program Adventure Running Kids.

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? It is always helpful to make your start on time.

What would a typical week of training look like for you? I am currently recovering from breaking(?) my toe orienteering, but if that wasn’t the case I would be getting my running/orienteering up to 10-11 hours a week at this point in the winter. This would include a few harder orienteering or running sessions, plus ideally strength 3 times a week.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? Well generally it has just been to train, study relevant maps, and taper a bit heading into the races. My specific preparations for major events hasn’t been the greatest in the past so that is something I need to improve on.

What is your big life orienteering goal? To keep training, enjoying the sport, and get to a level where I am actually competing at WOC, not just attending.


Damian Konotopetz

Year of Birth: 1990Club: Coureurs de Bois/ FWOC
Hometown: Winnipeg, MBCurrently Living: Calgary, AB
Occupation: EntrepreneurTraining Log
Twitter @dkonotopetzInstagram @damiankonotopetz
BlogPersonal Sponsors: Nuun Hydration

How did you first get involved in orienteering? From my parents.

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? Running speed is just as important as orienteering technique.

What would a typical week of training look like for you? Two interval trainings, one tempo, one long run, one moderate run, and one easy run. Two weights sessions and five core sessions.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? A few fast training and lots of rest.

What is your big life orienteering goal? Top 20 in the WOC Sprint


Emma Waddington

Year of Birth: 1998Club: Dontgetlost
Hometown: Hamilton, ONCurrently Living: Hamilton/Parry Sound, ON
Occupation: Orienteering Coach/InstructorTraining Log
Strava Instagram @emma__waddington
Blog Personal Sponsors: Nuun Hydration, Endurance Tap, NVii Sport, DK Orthotic Solutions
Processed with VSCO with p5 preset

How did you first get involved in orienteering? I got involved through my family, which mostly involved my dad dragging me out to events when I was little. I didn’t enjoy being out there too much, until Dontgetlost started the Adventure Running Kids program. Through my years of ARK, I made new friends and made so many fun memories, both of which encouraged me to join the National Team!

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? Being able to find the fun in any training or race is what is most important for development. On top of that, everything is about experience! Each “bad” race, or mistake that you make is a learning opportunity to improve for next time.

What would a typical week of training look like for you? Monday: Recovery run with strides and strength session. Tuesday: Interval workout. Wednesday: Recovery run or cross train, and strength session. Thursday: Tempo workout with hills. Friday: Recovery run with strides and strength session. Saturday: Long run with map, or long orienteering session. Sunday: REST and RECOVER! (I take this very seriously! Resting in training!) I try to include some map study whenever I can, if I can’t get on actual maps.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? On the night before the race, I’ll write out my race plan and schedule to keep myself organized in the morning, and visualize the whole day before I go to bed. Visualizing a bunch of scenarios helps me to prepare for whatever the day may hold and reduced potential surprises. I try not to get too in my head, but rather find a balance between staying positive and being deep in the zone.

What is your big life orienteering goal? A personal goal would be to place in the top 15 in an individual race at WOC. A more global goal is to continue to help develop young female athletes in this sport.


Jan Erik Naess

Year of Birth: 1998Club: FWOC, CAOC, Fossum IF
Hometown: Mississauga, ONCurrently Living: Calgary, AB
Occupation: StudentTraining Log
Instagram @janerikna

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? Make as many mistakes as you can, as soon as you can. It’s your mistakes that teach you about your physical and mental boundaries. In my opinion when you’re learning to orienteer you should be much more proud of a race with 75% awesome splits and 25% terrible ones than a race that is filled with splits that you know you could have run faster.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? I try to become well acquainted with the terrain long before the actual race. Sometimes this means watching others’ GoPro footage, viewing GPS tracks of competitors or starting to visualize myself running in the terrain. If possible, I try and do a couple of training camps in neighbouring terrain and to have a short taper before the race so that my mind and body are ready to perform at their best.


Robert Graham

Year of Birth: 1996Club: OOC
Hometown: Ottawa, ONCurrently Living: Ottawa, ON
Occupation: Software DeveloperTraining Log
Twitter @thekilograhamInstagram @robbiejaroslav

How did you first get involved in orienteering? Both my parents were heavily involved in the sport so they brought me out to events when I was young. I got interested in the competitive side during the 2012 Sass Peepree Camp after listening to the national team’s experience at JWOC in Slovakia.

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? Consistency and variety should be at the base of your training.

What would a typical week of training look like for you? I incorporate a lot of cross training into my routine to keep myself injury free. My week usually consists of orienteering, running, cycling, cross country skiing, and strength training. I also like to do some mental training either by studying old maps or running courses on Catching Features.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? Technical training in similar areas if possible, study old maps, adjust my workouts to prepare myself for the type of terrain.

What is your big life orienteering goal? Podium at the North American Champs.


Philipe Turcanu

Year of Birth: 2000Club: OOC
Hometown: Ottawa, ONCurrently Living: Ottawa/Guelph, ON
Occupation: StudentTraining Log
Instagram @lipy.turca

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? Train hard but have fun. If you aren’t having fun in sport you are not doing it the right way.

What would a typical week of training look like for you? Winter training week! These weeks are always high volume for me filled with plenty of kilometers on the roads, not too much in the woods because of the snow. Monday: Wake up at 7am, eat well and get ready for my first workout that is 12km of running in the woods. No extensive navigation, the idea is to get efficient in the woods. The afternoon is my first higher intensity workout of 3000m interval repeats. Tuesday: Wake up is 6am, light food since I am going into a hard 10km tempo at a very fast pace followed immediately by 5km of jogging to loosen up the legs and to flush them out. Afterwards in the evening, looking at a Leg Strength circuit that lasts about 45-60mins. Wednesday: 7am wake up, 9am is my first Orienteering course of the week. About 10-12km in length and not a very fast pace. In the afternoon is a very easy 10km on the roads used as an active recovery. After this run, a core routine that lasts 45-60mins. Thursday: 6am wake up and at 7am, I am on the roads, this time for a threshold run of 20-30km depending on my progression. I like to add as much versatility to terrain so that I run in trails, roads, paths, hills etc. during this run. The rest of the day is off except for the evening where I have the same Leg strength routine from Tuesday. Friday: 7am wake up, 9am is my second Orienteering course OR trail run. About 10-12km in length and not a very fast pace. In the afternoon is a very easy 10km on the roads used as an active recovery. Saturday: This is my sleep in day and I usually wake up around 9am starting the day off with a very easy 10km. The afternoon is my very fast sprint like workout of either 400 or 600m repeats. I usually do this one on the track but I love doing it on my school’s campus and zigzagging through buildings. Sunday: My day off, I spend it walking my dog, stretching and catching up on either sleep or work :)

What is your big life orienteering goal? My big life goal in Orienteering is to become a world champion in all disciplines. My love and dedication is why I believe I can do it and I will follow my dream all the way!

2021 Senior Development Team

Adam Woods

Year of Birth: 1994Club: GVOC
Hometown: Coquitlam, BCCurrently Living: Vancouver, BC
Occupation: Software DeveloperTraining Log
Twitter @a_runwoodsrun

How did you first get involved in orienteering? My parents saw it in the local community centre activity guide. I followed my Dad around the course and on some questionable “shortcuts”. Luckily I enjoyed the bushwhacking and decided orienteering was a fun sport!

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? When talking about how a race went, remember to talk about the legs that went well and not just the legs that went poorly. It’s very easy to focus on mistakes but equally important to recognise your successes.

What would a typical week of training look like for you? Do intervals on Monday, a 12 km run Tuesday, and local club orienteering event on Wednesday. Take Thursday as a rest day, intervals on Friday, and use the weekend for fun workouts like XC skiing, running a day hike or doing a night O.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? Looking at old maps and planning courses on them is important. However, getting enough sleep in the weeks leading up to the competition is very important for me. (It’s easy to sabotage all the training you’ve done by failing to rest up before an important race).

What is your big life orienteering goal? Until a few years ago my goal was racing at the world university orienteering championships. Now that I’ve attended the world university orienteering championships twice, my goal is racing the world championships.


Emma Sherwood

Year of Birth: 1997Club: FWOC
Hometown: Calgary, ABCurrently Living: Hamilton, ON
Occupation: StudentTraining Log
Twitter @emmasherwood02Instagram @emma_sherwood_02

How did you first get involved in orienteering? When I was 11, Kitty Jones suggested to my mom that my brother and I might enjoy orienteering. My first time, I learned how to read contours at Nose Hill in Calgary. I thoroughly enjoyed it from day one.

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? Look out for all the opportunities to go orienteering available, get out there and enjoy it!

What would a typical week of training look like for you? I’ll go on a few runs, normally including one with some speed work and one longer one. For some variety, I’ve also been road cycling lately. I also try for some orienteering if there is a map I can get to. Beyond this, I do strength workouts, stretching and yoga. I’m working on incorporating more map study into my training.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? In the weeks leading up to the race, I will study the old maps of the area and try to get in training in relevant terrain. Based on this, I make three goals to focus on during the race. The night before, ensuring I get enough sleep is a priority. On the day of the race, I try to keep things consistent: I eat my standard race breakfast (as near as I can to a bowl of muesli with water and two pieces of toast with jam) and do my normal physical and mental warmup.

What is your big life orienteering goal? I would like to be able to confidently represent Canada at WOC.


Graeme Farrand

Year of Birth: 2000Club: Dontgetlost
Hometown: Hamilton, ONCurrently Living: Waterloo, ON
Occupation: StudentTraining Log

How did you first get involved in orienteering? Start though my club’s (Don’t Get Lost) weekly running program for kids which introduced me to the concept of running with a map.

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? Review your races/trainings after you finished, especially with others. I can be quite fun to compare with what other people did and see where you went wrong.

What would a typical week of training look like for you? A mix of milage and higher intensity runs through the work week then long run and hopefully an o-training on the weekend.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? Read/look through all the material about the race before hand and set out about 2-3 goals/phases I want to be thinking about while racing.

What is your big life orienteering goal? Compete at WOC.


Graeme Rennie

Year of Birth: 1991Club: GVOC
Hometown: North Vancouver, BCCurrently Living: Dublin, Ireland
Occupation: Software Engineer Training Log
Instagram @graemerenn

How did you first get involved in orienteering? With my parents.

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? Don’t let the mistakes discourage you. Orienteering take time to learn, we all made our share of embarrassing mistakes.

What would a typical week of training look like for you? 1 or 2 Interval or tempo sessions, 1 orienteering training, 1 easy long run, 1 yoga session, 1 strength session, plus other rolling/stretching.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? Try and get trainings on relevant terrain.

What is your big life orienteering goal? Orienteer in as many countries as possible.


Michael Kondro

Year of Birth: 1993Club: FWOC
Hometown: Calgary, ONCurrently Living: Calgary, ON
Occupation: Environmental GeologistTraining Log
Instagram @Ride_and_run

How did you first get involved in orienteering? I was introduced to orienteering during my final years in university.

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? If you take the time, reading your map gets easier, and you will get better.

What would a typical week of training look like for you? 2 interval workouts, one long run, one tempo run, and several recovery and off day runs along with weights and core exercises.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? Pick out a good playlist and visualize the good route choices I will be making.

What is your big life orienteering goal? Compete at WOC


Pia Blake

Year of Birth: 1996Club: YOA, Lunds OK
Hometown: Whitehorse, YTCurrently Living: Lund, Sweden
Occupation: Student

How did you first get involved in orienteering? I was first introduced to orienteering by my parents and would often take my stuffed animals for strolls in the woods, having fun exploring with the help of my trusted friends!

How do you normally prepare for an important race? I like to make sure I have a training schedule that gets my to the race in as good running condition as possible, examine and discuss the old maps of the area, and if there is a time zone change involved, get there with as much time as possible beforehand.

2021 Junior Development Team

Andrew McLaren

Year of Birth: 2003 Club: FWOC
Hometown: Calgary, ABCurrently Living: Calgary, AB
Occupation: Student Training Log
Instagram: @Andrew_j_mclaren

How did you first get involved in orienteering? When I was 11 or 12 I joined the SOGO Level 2 program in Calgary and then moved up into the Level 3 program where I started going to local events. When I got into the more competitive aspect of orienteering is when I really started to love the sport.

What is your big life orienteering goal? To keep orienteering for as long as I can and to never stop enjoying it. Also to represent Canada and majors events, but mainly the former.


Brenden Doogan

Year of Birth: 2004 Club: Dontgetlost
Hometown: Burlington, ON Currently Living: Burlington, ON
Occupation: Student Training Log

How did you first get involved in orienteering? DontGetLost’s Adventure Running Kids program. There was a flyer in the Well Wood Charity Run’s signup package advertising the program. I joined when I was about 8 or 9.

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? Memorize the legend and look for patterns in the terrain and map. Looking for patterns in the land can help visualize what the next step in the race will be.

What would a typical week of training look like for you? In a typical year, in the spring season I would participate in orienteering practice on Tuesdays and Thursdays with the possibility of a race on the weekend. Mondays and Fridays I would go to CrossFit classes and on Wednesdays I would go for a lighter run.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? I prepare for an important race by increasing the volume of orienteering I do. I feel that the mental gymnastics needed to navigate on a map is the cure to the amount of boredom I face when road running. Additionally, the inevitable mistakes that are made help me identify and iron out issues with my navigation.

What is your big life orienteering goal? My biggest orienteering goal is to participate in the World Orienteering Championships. However, in the meantime, and in order for me to get there, I feel that I would like to gain more confidence in my abilities and learn more niche information on the sport.


Evan Raz

Year of Birth: 2003Club: OOC
Hometown: Ottawa, ON Currently Living: Ottawa, ON
Occupation: Student Training Log     

How did you first get involved in orienteering? I first got involved in the sport by participating in the Ottawa Orienteering Youth Program, which really helped fuel my love for map running at a young age.

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? Look around and see what kind of programs are offered in your area, and try to make it to as many events as possible!

What would a typical week of training look like for you? I like to do a variety of training activities, making sure to mix in some armchair orienteering as well. My favourite ways to train include regular meets, trail runs, and biking, as well as analysis using routegadget and worldofO.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? I tend to stress myself out, so I try really hard to stay calm, relaxed, and ready.

What is you big life orienteering goal? My main goal is to reach a point where I can consistently perform well, and feel confident that every run will go smoothly (and that if it doesn’t I can always recover quickly)


Ewan Winn

Year of Birth: 2004Club: FWOC
Hometown: Calgary, ABCurrently Living: Calgary, AB
Occupation: StudentInstagram @ewan_winn

How did you first get involved in orienteering? My parents got me involved in Orienteering from the start. I remember doing a string course in switzerland when I was 2 years old. I’ve been trough all of the stages in the orienteering program, from when I was a toddler to now. The first big competition I remember going to was the NAOCs in Arnprior in 2014.

What would a typical week of training look like for you? Normally I have a structured workout 4 times a week, and the other 3 days I will go for a jog or run for about half an hour. during a structured workout I’ll do 10-20 minutes of warm up, which includes a short run, dynamic stretches and a couple acceleration sprints. The workout normally consists of intervals, either speed or endurance based with a set amount of rest. After I’ll typically do a 1 kilometre cooldown jog.


Keeya Corbett

Year of Birth: 2002Club: SAGE
Hometown: Salmon Arm, BCCurrently Living: Salmon Arm, BC
Occupation: Instagram @Koalakeeya

How did you first get involved in orienteering? A ski coach for my ski team would set up a course for a fun practice.

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? My tip for Young orienteers would be to not get distracted by those running around only focus on where you need to go.

What would a typical week of training look like for you? During the beginning of the season I like to have already a 5km run base and will work up from that until at least 10km. Around this time I am also do an alternating each week of zone 4 and zone 3 intervals. I also do strength at least once a week (including core).

How do you normally prepare for an important race? Before a race I like to look over and run on the warm up map ( if available). I also like to listen to music so I can have one point of focus when visualizing my race and not the noise of other people.

What is your big life orienteering goal? I would eventually be able to attend WOC. I would also like to attend JWOC again.


Lukas Raz

Year of Birth: 2005Club: OOC
Hometown: Ottawa, ONCurrently Living: Ottawa, ON
Occupation: Student Training Log

How did you first get involved in orienteering? I first got into orienteering by participating in a summer course as a fun activity. I then started going to local events, and this sport quickly became my focus.

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? My tip to new and young orienteers would be to remember that there are multiple aspects of orienteering. Don’t only work on your fitness, or your map reading. Make sure to balance your training out over all these things.

What would a typical week of training look like for you? A typical week of training during the winter involves quite a few activities. I try to take advantage of the different options you have to improve your strength in the winter, so I alternate between things like snowshoe racing, biking, running, and skiing.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? When I’m preparing for an important race, I try to focus on improving what I did poorly last time. Every race is a learning opportunity, and every race shows me what I need to change for the next one.

What is your big life orienteering goal? My big orienteering goal is to be able to compete with the world’s best at global events.


Robyn Astridge

Year of Birth: 2004Club: FWOC
Hometown: Calgary, ABCurrently Living: Calgary, AB
Occupation: Student

How did you first get involved in orienteering? When I was very young, my parents would push me around on a stroller around city park orienteering courses in Calgary. A few years later, when I was old enough, I got involved in FWOC’s junior program.

What would a typical week of training look like for you? During a regular fall season, my week would look something like this: Monday: swim practice, orienteering, Tuesday: swim practice, Wednesday: swim practice and core work, Thursday: running intervals, swim practice, Friday: swim practice, weights, Saturday: morning swim practice, afternoon orienteering, Sunday: sprint orienteering.


Sianna Litzen

Year of Birth: 2001Club: Dontgetlost
Hometown: Dundas, ONCurrently Living: Dundas, ON
Occupation: Student

How did you first get involved in orienteering? My mom signed me up for DontGetLost’s Adventure Running Kids program when it first started.

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? It is ok to make mistakes!

What would a typical week of training look like for you? Two to three runs, two to three strength, and three to four bikes.

What is your big life orienteering goal? Orienteer all over the world!


Tara Doherty

Year of Birth: 2001Club: Dontgetlost
Hometown: Burlington, ONCurrently Living: Thunder Bay, ON
Occupation: StudentTraining Log
Instagram @_tara_doherty

How did you first get involved in orienteering? My mother found DontGetLost’s kids program through one of her co-workers, and signed me up when I was 13. She wanted to find a sport that got me moving and kept me outside, so orienteering seemed like the perfect choice. I wasn’t an athletic kid, but pretty quickly fell in love with the mental aspect of orienteering. I did the kid’s program for 2 years, before starting to run races, and really focusing on orienteering.

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? My tip for young orienteers is to take things slow. Orienteering is a very mental sport, and it takes time to get the hang of the technical aspects. Going slower while making sure you stay in control of where you are really helps build the skills needed to move faster in the future. For the most part, going slower while staying in control usually ends up being faster than rushing and making big mistakes.


2021 Junior National Team

Alec LeHelloco

Year of Birth: 2004Club: OOC; OPA Montigny (France)
Hometown: Ottawa, ONCurrently Living: Gif-sur-Yvette, France
Occupation: Student

How did you first get involved in orienteering? When I was 10 years old, I was living in Ottawa, and my parents bought a house in a new neighbourhood. Soon after we moved in, I met with my neighbour. The man was very interesting, and he explained to my family what orienteering is. In fact, he was very much involved with the Ottawa orienteering club and it did not take long for my family to join one of the meets that get organized on Sunday mornings. For the first time I ran, I was with my parents, we took a course that probably was a bit over our totally beginner level, and we got quite lost. And I loved it! Since then my neighbour showed me maps, and explained lots of things to me during our “driveway discussions”. And he even gave me some really nice orienteering maps, which I still have. Since then I never stopped orienteering, even after I moved out of Ottawa, and I will certainly never forget Brian Graham, the man who made me love maps, love running in the woods, and love orienteering.

What is your big life orienteering goal? My main goal as an orienteering competitor is to someday represent Canada at the WOC (World Orienteering Championships). To achieve this objective I want to train and keep progressing over the next 6 years. But my bigger life goal in orienteering is to practice this wonderful sport during my whole life, for as long as I can run or walk really, and keep enjoying navigating through the beautiful forests of our Planet.


Isak Fransson

Year of Birth: 2003Club: Dontgetlost, OK Njudung (Sweden)
Hometown: Hamilton, ONCurrently Living: Hamilton, ON
Occupation: StudentTraining Log
Instagram @isak.fransson

How did you first get involved in orienteering? My dad grew up running orienteering and he passed it on to me. I now love the sport and we go to as many races as can!

What would a typical week of training look like for you? All year I try and make my week look like this: Sunday Long Run, Monday Jog, Tuesday Intervals, Wednesday Jog, Thursday Intervals, Friday Jog or off, Saturday intervals

Athlete Profile: Will Critchley

Born1984
HometownEdmonton, AB
Currently LivingJyväskylä, Finland
OccupationSport Psychology Coach,
Intellectual Property Manager
Training LogStrava
Twitter@I_Will_Perform

If you had one tip for young orienteers, what would it be?
The most interesting thing I’ve learned in psychology, from educational psychology, is to spend time “thinking about thinking”. Too often people attribute mental abilities to being naturally good at something, which I concluded is wrong. Its just a matter of those people having figured out how to organize the information they receive and utilize it in an effective matter. It is why there are people that can memorize pi to hundreds of digits. They have come up with strategies to effectively memorize and recall the information. They have structured their thinking in a meaningful way. So, when it comes to orienteering, think about your process, what information do you need? What information do you need to store? How do you make it meaningful and effective for your strategies? Every map might be different, but you can start with identifying in every terrain what are the important features, how do you make them stand out to you, in the terrain and on the map?

What would a typical week of training look like for you (at a part of the season of your choosing)?
3 intensity sessions per week, Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. Filler training the rest of the week, consisting of easy volume, or a strength workout twice a week. Saturdays and Sundays are ideally days to “double down”, or to do a longer workout on Sunday. This is a fairly standard training system for people who work full-time.


Will is a member of Orienteering Canada’s 2020 High Performance Program.

Athlete Profile: Robert Graham

Born1996
HometownOttawa, ON
Currently LivingOttawa, ON
ClubOrienteering Ottawa
Occupation Software Developer
Training LogAttackpoint
Twitter@thekilograham
Instagram

How did you first get involved in orienteering? 
My parents were heavily involved in the sport (both national team members) so they dragged me out to our local Sunday meets, occasionally against my will ;). My first orienteering event I was 3 weeks old and my mother carried me around the novice course in Gatineau park.

What would a typical week of training look like for you (at a part of the season of your choosing)?
I start the week off in the gym with a lower body workout, deadlift is my favourite. On Tuesday I do a light cardio activity like running, biking, or cross-country skiing. Wednesday morning, I do some conditioning, strengthening little muscles used for stabilization, balance, and injury prevention. In the evening our club has a local running group that always does some fun and interesting workouts. Thursday is another day of light cardio. Friday I’m back in the gym this time for upper body (for cross country skiing but also to have a little more power when I’m out in the woods). Weekends I’m either away at races or if not, I’ll do some long activities. Again biking, skiing, running, or orienteering, usually up in Gatineau Park. And all throughout the week I look at maps, old courses, do some visualization, and mediation to stay sharp. I find this is great to do in the winter, so come the orienteering season I can get right into the swing of things.


Robert is a member of Orienteering Canada’s 2020 High Performance Program.

Athlete Profile: Tomas Graham

Born1998
HometownOttawa, ON
Currently Living Ottawa, ON
ClubOrienteering Ottawa
Occupation Student
Training LogAttackpoint
Twitter@tomastommytom
Instagram@tomasnotthomas

How did you first get involved in orienteering? 
My parents were both very involved in the sport, locally and internationally. They sent me out into the forest as soon as I could walk! I didn’t immediately fall in love, it actually took quite a while, but I eventually did. I owe everything to them for getting me involved in the sport.

If you had one tip for young orienteers, what would it be?
Navigation always comes first! The best orienteers always figure out where they need to go and what to look for before they run. Focus on the map/terrain and your speed will come naturally.

What would a typical week of training look like for you (at a part of the season of your choosing)?
At the height of my training, I’m doing actual orienteering maybe twice or thrice a week. On top of that I’ll go on 2 to 3 runs (distance, intervals, hills, etc.). I also do my best to squeeze in some strength/core and some map-reading in between.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? 
It may sound silly, but I almost don’t treat it as a race, but rather a training session. The second you start worrying about your position or about winning, you start to lose focus on your navigation and mistakes can be made. When you adopt the training session mentality (i.e. thinking solely about navigation and tactics), you can concentrate better on executing proper orienteering skills which leads to a good performance.

What is your big life orienteering goal?
Be involved in the sport for as long as possible. It’s so inspiring to see people well into their 90s participate in the sport. Even when I pass my prime, as long as my legs and brain work, I’ll be orienteering!


Tomas is a member of Orienteering Canada’s 2020 High Performance Program.

Athlete Profile: Michael Kondro

Born1993
HometownCalgary, AB
Currently LivingCalgary, AB
Club FWOC

How did you first get involved in orienteering? 
Damian Konotopetz got me into it as we were teammates on the Varsity track and field team at U of C.

If you had one tip for young orienteers, what would it be?
Have fun. Running and training is easier when you enjoy it.

What would a typical week of training look like for you (at a part of the season of your choosing)?
A typical week of training involves morning short runs, afternoon runs plus 2 track workouts a week, one long run / tempo and 1 – 2 orienteering workouts plus training sessions, ontop of work, sleep and downtime with friends.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? 
I create a playlist of music that gets me pumped up and visualize how I want the race to go.

What is your big life orienteering goal?
Race at WOC


Michael is a member of Orienteering Canada’s 2020 High Performance Program.

Athlete Profile: Damian Konotopetz

Born1990
HometownWinnipeg, MB
Currently LivingCalgary, AB
ClubCoureurs de Bois
FWOC
Training LogAttackpoint

Damian is a member of Orienteering Canada’s 2020 High Performance Program.

Athlete Profile: Christian Michelsen

Born1999
HometownDundas, ON
Currently LivingVaxjo, Sweden
ClubDontgetlost
Vaxjo OK
OccupationStudent
Training LogAttackpoint

How did you first get involved in orienteering? 
I began running with Adventure running kids when I was 13 or 14. I started orienteering with the program and kept with it.

What would a typical week of training look like for you (at a part of the season of your choosing)?
Generally about 3 harder sessions a week, maybe 2 running intervals, and another orienteering. About 9-10 hours of running and then another couple hours of cycling or strength

How do you normally prepare for an important race? 
For any races that I’m taking fairly seriously, I’ll find a map of the terrain to get an idea of the challenges I’ll be facing. Other than that I just try to get a good sleep the night before and breakfast in the morning. Obviously, the more important the race the more time I put into preparing.

What is your big life orienteering goal?
My ‘elite’ big life orienteering goal would be to just generally be in the group of top orienteers. If I get there I’m happy. I just like orienteering, and have aspirations to be good, but no clear goals. In the long term, just really enjoy the sport.


Christian is a member of Orienteering Canada’s 2020 High Performance Program.