Archives

A sample text widget

Etiam pulvinar consectetur dolor sed malesuada. Ut convallis euismod dolor nec pretium. Nunc ut tristique massa.

Nam sodales mi vitae dolor ullamcorper et vulputate enim accumsan. Morbi orci magna, tincidunt vitae molestie nec, molestie at mi. Nulla nulla lorem, suscipit in posuere in, interdum non magna.

2021 Annual General Meeting

Date: Thursday, July 22, 2021
Time: 5:00 pm Pacific time
Location and address: Virtually via zoom. Contact tracy@orienteering.ca or president@orienteering.ca to get the link for the meeting.

The AGM is the one time of year when all the members of Orienteering Canada (the provincial/territorial associations and the Athlete Rep) gather to discuss and decide on the business tasks of the association (such as electing board members, making changes to the constitution, reviewing the financial statements, etc).

2021 AGM documents:

Other documents of interest:

2021 AGM information Voting delegates confirmed to date:

BCBrian Ellis
YukonCraig Brooks
AlbertaKim Kasperski
Saskatchewan (welcome!)Calvin Lai
Manitoba Reine-Marie Guillermic
Ontario Amber Panchyshyn
Quebecxx
New BrunswickLori Heron
Nova ScotiaEmily Secord

NOMINATIONS

The position of Treasurer (2 year term), and 3 members at large of the Board (2 year terms) will be up for election. Nominations received to date:

Treasurer: Bruce Glen
Member at large: Malin Hansen
Member at large: Erik Blake

NEW BUSINESS

Deadline to submit items for New Business was July 9, 2021. No new business was received.

2021 Senior National Team

Christian Michelsen

Year of Birth: 1999Club: Dontgetlost, Växjö OK
Hometown: Hamilton, ONCurrently Living: Växjö, Sweden
Occupation: StudentTraining Log

How did you first get involved in orienteering? Through DONTGETLOST’s youth program Adventure Running Kids.

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? It is always helpful to make your start on time.

What would a typical week of training look like for you? I am currently recovering from breaking(?) my toe orienteering, but if that wasn’t the case I would be getting my running/orienteering up to 10-11 hours a week at this point in the winter. This would include a few harder orienteering or running sessions, plus ideally strength 3 times a week.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? Well generally it has just been to train, study relevant maps, and taper a bit heading into the races. My specific preparations for major events hasn’t been the greatest in the past so that is something I need to improve on.

What is your big life orienteering goal? To keep training, enjoying the sport, and get to a level where I am actually competing at WOC, not just attending.


Damian Konotopetz

Year of Birth: 1990Club: Coureurs de Bois/ FWOC
Hometown: Winnipeg, MBCurrently Living: Calgary, AB
Occupation: EntrepreneurTraining Log
Twitter @dkonotopetzInstagram @damiankonotopetz
BlogPersonal Sponsors: Nuun Hydration

How did you first get involved in orienteering? From my parents.

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? Running speed is just as important as orienteering technique.

What would a typical week of training look like for you? Two interval trainings, one tempo, one long run, one moderate run, and one easy run. Two weights sessions and five core sessions.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? A few fast training and lots of rest.

What is your big life orienteering goal? Top 20 in the WOC Sprint


Emma Waddington

Year of Birth: 1998Club: Dontgetlost
Hometown: Hamilton, ONCurrently Living: Hamilton/Parry Sound, ON
Occupation: Orienteering Coach/InstructorTraining Log
Strava Instagram @emma__waddington
Blog Personal Sponsors: Nuun Hydration, Endurance Tap, NVii Sport, DK Orthotic Solutions
Processed with VSCO with p5 preset

How did you first get involved in orienteering? I got involved through my family, which mostly involved my dad dragging me out to events when I was little. I didn’t enjoy being out there too much, until Dontgetlost started the Adventure Running Kids program. Through my years of ARK, I made new friends and made so many fun memories, both of which encouraged me to join the National Team!

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? Being able to find the fun in any training or race is what is most important for development. On top of that, everything is about experience! Each “bad” race, or mistake that you make is a learning opportunity to improve for next time.

What would a typical week of training look like for you? Monday: Recovery run with strides and strength session. Tuesday: Interval workout. Wednesday: Recovery run or cross train, and strength session. Thursday: Tempo workout with hills. Friday: Recovery run with strides and strength session. Saturday: Long run with map, or long orienteering session. Sunday: REST and RECOVER! (I take this very seriously! Resting in training!) I try to include some map study whenever I can, if I can’t get on actual maps.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? On the night before the race, I’ll write out my race plan and schedule to keep myself organized in the morning, and visualize the whole day before I go to bed. Visualizing a bunch of scenarios helps me to prepare for whatever the day may hold and reduced potential surprises. I try not to get too in my head, but rather find a balance between staying positive and being deep in the zone.

What is your big life orienteering goal? A personal goal would be to place in the top 15 in an individual race at WOC. A more global goal is to continue to help develop young female athletes in this sport.


Jan Erik Naess

Year of Birth: 1998Club: FWOC, CAOC, Fossum IF
Hometown: Mississauga, ONCurrently Living: Calgary, AB
Occupation: StudentTraining Log
Instagram @janerikna

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? Make as many mistakes as you can, as soon as you can. It’s your mistakes that teach you about your physical and mental boundaries. In my opinion when you’re learning to orienteer you should be much more proud of a race with 75% awesome splits and 25% terrible ones than a race that is filled with splits that you know you could have run faster.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? I try to become well acquainted with the terrain long before the actual race. Sometimes this means watching others’ GoPro footage, viewing GPS tracks of competitors or starting to visualize myself running in the terrain. If possible, I try and do a couple of training camps in neighbouring terrain and to have a short taper before the race so that my mind and body are ready to perform at their best.


Robert Graham

Year of Birth: 1996Club: OOC
Hometown: Ottawa, ONCurrently Living: Ottawa, ON
Occupation: Software DeveloperTraining Log
Twitter @thekilograhamInstagram @robbiejaroslav

How did you first get involved in orienteering? Both my parents were heavily involved in the sport so they brought me out to events when I was young. I got interested in the competitive side during the 2012 Sass Peepree Camp after listening to the national team’s experience at JWOC in Slovakia.

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? Consistency and variety should be at the base of your training.

What would a typical week of training look like for you? I incorporate a lot of cross training into my routine to keep myself injury free. My week usually consists of orienteering, running, cycling, cross country skiing, and strength training. I also like to do some mental training either by studying old maps or running courses on Catching Features.

How do you normally prepare for an important race? Technical training in similar areas if possible, study old maps, adjust my workouts to prepare myself for the type of terrain.

What is your big life orienteering goal? Podium at the North American Champs.


Philipe Turcanu

Year of Birth: 2000Club: OOC
Hometown: Ottawa, ONCurrently Living: Ottawa/Guelph, ON
Occupation: StudentTraining Log
Instagram @lipy.turca

If you had one tip for young orienteers what would it be? Train hard but have fun. If you aren’t having fun in sport you are not doing it the right way.

What would a typical week of training look like for you? Winter training week! These weeks are always high volume for me filled with plenty of kilometers on the roads, not too much in the woods because of the snow. Monday: Wake up at 7am, eat well and get ready for my first workout that is 12km of running in the woods. No extensive navigation, the idea is to get efficient in the woods. The afternoon is my first higher intensity workout of 3000m interval repeats. Tuesday: Wake up is 6am, light food since I am going into a hard 10km tempo at a very fast pace followed immediately by 5km of jogging to loosen up the legs and to flush them out. Afterwards in the evening, looking at a Leg Strength circuit that lasts about 45-60mins. Wednesday: 7am wake up, 9am is my first Orienteering course of the week. About 10-12km in length and not a very fast pace. In the afternoon is a very easy 10km on the roads used as an active recovery. After this run, a core routine that lasts 45-60mins. Thursday: 6am wake up and at 7am, I am on the roads, this time for a threshold run of 20-30km depending on my progression. I like to add as much versatility to terrain so that I run in trails, roads, paths, hills etc. during this run. The rest of the day is off except for the evening where I have the same Leg strength routine from Tuesday. Friday: 7am wake up, 9am is my second Orienteering course OR trail run. About 10-12km in length and not a very fast pace. In the afternoon is a very easy 10km on the roads used as an active recovery. Saturday: This is my sleep in day and I usually wake up around 9am starting the day off with a very easy 10km. The afternoon is my very fast sprint like workout of either 400 or 600m repeats. I usually do this one on the track but I love doing it on my school’s campus and zigzagging through buildings. Sunday: My day off, I spend it walking my dog, stretching and catching up on either sleep or work :)

What is your big life orienteering goal? My big life goal in Orienteering is to become a world champion in all disciplines. My love and dedication is why I believe I can do it and I will follow my dream all the way!

Postponement of the 2020 Canadian Rockies Orienteering Festival until 2021


With all the uncertainty surrounding Covid-19 and in line with other sporting events, the 2020 Canadian Rockies Orienteering Festival (CROF) including the 2020 Canadian Orienteering Championships (COCs), Western Canadian Orienteering Championships (WCOCs), Crowsnest Barebones events and the Sass Peepre National Training Junior Camp scheduled to take place in July 3-12, 2020 have been postponed until 2021.

This will be a disappointment for many, as it is to the organizers, but we feel at this time, it is the only responsible decision to make. We do not take this decision lightly, as 2020 will be the first time that the Canadian Orienteering Championships will not be held since the first COCs in 1968.

The Canadian Rockies Orienteering Festival will be rescheduled for the summer of 2021.

Please see the full statement with more details at: https://crof2020.com/

2020 Annual General Meeting

Date: Thursday, August 6, 2020
Time: 5:00 pm Pacific time
Location and address: To be held virtually via zoom. Contact tracy@orienteering.ca or president@orienteering.ca to get the link for the meeting.

The AGM is the one time of year when all the members of Orienteering Canada (the provincial/territorial associations) gather to discuss and decide on the business tasks of the association (such as electing board members, making changes to the constitution, reviewing the financial statements, etc).

2020 AGM documents:

Other documents of interest:

2020 AGM information Voting delegates confirmed to date:

BCBrian Ellis
YukonAfan Jones
AlbertaMarsha Fehr
ManitobaSébastien Kerhervé
OntarioAmber Panchyshyn
QuebecMartin Valiquette
New BrunswickLori Heron
Nova ScotiaEmily Secord

NOMINATIONS

The position of President (2 year term), and 2 members at large of the Board (2 year terms) will be up for election. Nominations received to date:

President: xx
Member at large: Emma Sherwood
Member at large: xx

NEW BUSINESS

Deadline to submit items for New Business was July 17, 2020. No new business items were submitted.

Inviting Nominations to the 2020 class of the Orienteering Canada Hall of Fame

The Orienteering Canada Hall of Fame was introduced in 2017, as part of Orienteering Canada’s 50th anniversary celebrations. We inducted 10 individuals as Builders (now called the Order of Orienteering Canada) in the inaugural Orienteering Canada Hall of Fame: Pat de St. Croix, Jack Forsyth, Kitty Jones, Colin Kirk, Jack Lee, Charlotte MacNaughton, Sass Peepre, Chris Skene, Patricia Skene and Jim Webster. Read more about the inaugural inductees here.

We are now launching our on-going Hall of Fame process, as we build on and grow our Hall of Fame. We have expanded the number of categories. The nomination window is now open.

Timeline
January 15 – request for nominations announced
February 15 – nomination deadline
March 15 – Hall of Fame inductees announced
Nominations will be accepted every two years: 2020, 2022, 2024, etc.

Purpose & Categories
Great sport organizations are built with purpose, and by people with passion, vision and dedication. This sport thrives because of the people who have made distinguished, lasting and valuable contributions and commitment to improve all areas of orienteering. The purpose of the Orienteering Canada Hall of Fame is to recognize and honour the individuals who have made exceptional contributions to the sport in Canada. The Orienteering Canada Hall of Fame includes the following categories:

  1. Order of Orienteering Canada (Lifetime Achievement)
    (The initial 2017 inductees are in this category. We have changed the name from the original “Builder” category).
  2. Athlete Leadership
  3. Coaching Leadership
  4. Officials Leadership
  5. Administrator Award of Distinction

Category Information

Order of Orienteering Canada (Lifetime Achievement)
This category recognizes and brings attention to those who have demonstrated an extraordinary commitment to building the sport of orienteering in Canada. Individuals in this category have dedicated years of leadership service at international, national, provincial/territorial and/or the club level. Their vision, leadership and effort has made a distinct, valuable, positive and long lasting impact on Canadian orienteering.
This lifetime achievement award shall be given to individuals who have contributed to the sports heritage of Canadian orienteering for a period of not less than fifteen (15) years, although such a period of service need not necessarily be consecutive.
The Order of Orienteering Canada is the highest award in Canadian orienteering. 

Athlete Leadership
The category applies to athletes who have achieved outstanding and long term success in Canada, or as a Canadian competing abroad and who demonstrate exemplary values, both on and off the field of play. Athletes will be evaluated on their personal sport achievements and also on their contributions and the impact they have made to orienteering in their community.

Officials Leadership
Individuals in this category have made an exemplary contribution over a period of years as an official (course setter, controller and/or event director). Individuals may have also made a significant contribution as a developer or instructor of Orienteering Canada’s officials development programs and/or other technical aspects of the sport (such as: rules, event guidelines, LTAD development, etc). Outstanding Canadian mappers may also be included in this category.

Coaching Leadership
Individuals in this category have made an outstanding contribution over a period of years as an orienteering coach and/or as a developer or instructor of Orienteering Canada’s coaching programs.
Ideally, the coach will have training from the National Coaching Certification Program, although this is not an absolute requirement.

Administrator Award of Distinction
Individuals in this category have made a significant contribution to the growth and development of the sport with their orienteering club or provincial/territorial orienteering association or at the  national level. They have made a significant contribution to developing orienteering as a Board member, program developer, innovative promoter of orienteering, etc. They have been a difference maker

The fine print

  • The inductees will be selected by a panel, cross represented at the National, Provincial/Territorial and club level. 
  • More than one person may be inducted per category.
  • The nominator is advised to pick the category which is the strongest fit for your nominee, and to also include relevant information for their involvement in orienteering in other categories. 
  • The selection committee has the discretion to move a nominee to a different category.
  • Inductees may be inducted in more than one category over time.
  • Posthumous nominations are welcome.

Nomination Process
If you would like to nominate someone to the Orienteering Canada Hall of Fame, please download the nomination form here and submit to awards@orienteering.ca by February 15, 2020.

2019 Annual General Meeting

Date: Thursday July 25, 2019.
Time: 3:00pm
Location and address: Ski Morin-Heights chalet- 2nd floor, 231 Rue Allen, Morin-Heights, QC, J0R 1H0

The AGM is the one time of year when all the members of Orienteering Canada (the provincial/territorial associations) gather to discuss and decide on the business tasks of the association (such as electing board members, making changes to the constitution, reviewing the financial statements, etc).

2019 AGM documents:

(other documents and links for the above will be added here as they are available)

Other documents of interest:

2019 AGM information Voting delegates confirmed to date:

BCDavid Bakker
YukonForest Pearson
AlbertaMarion Owen
ManitobaSébastien Kerhervé
OntarioAndrei Logvin
QuebecAnna Fichman
New BrunswickLori Heron
Nova ScotiaEmily Secord

NOMINATIONS

The position of Treasurer (2 year term), and 3 members at large of the Board (2 year terms) will be up for election. Nominations received:

Treasurer: Amanda Edmunds
Member at large: Cheryl Smith
Member at large: Stan Woods
Member at large: Bruce Rennie

NEW BUSINESS

Deadline to submit items for New Business is July 12th, 2019

2018 Annual General Meeting

Date: Wednesday August 22, 2018.
Time: 3:00 pm
Location and address: Coast High Country Inn, Ballroom B, 4051 – 4th Avenue
Whitehorse, Yukon

The AGM is the one time of year when all the members of Orienteering Canada (the provincial/territorial associations) gather to discuss and decide on the business tasks of the association (such as electing board members, making changes to the constitution, reviewing the financial statements, etc).

2018 AGM documents:

(other documents and links for the above will be added here as they are available)

Other documents of interest:

2018 AGM information Voting delegates confirmed to date:

BC  Brian Ellis
Yukon  Afan Jones
Alberta  David Campden
Manitoba  Jennifer Hamilton
Ontario  Kris Gadjanski
Quebec  Dmitri Golovanov
New Brunswick  Lori Heron
Nova Scotia  Emily Secord

NOMINATIONS

The position of President (2 year term), and 2 members at large of the Board (2 year terms) will be up for election. Nominations received:

President: Anne Teutsch (for one year only)
Member at large: Don Riddle
Member at large:

NEW BUSINESS

Deadline to submit items for New Business was Aug 10, 2018

2018 Jr National Training Camp registration now open

The 2018 Sass Peepre Junior Training Camp will be held August 15-16 in Whitehorse, Yukon, right before the North American Orienteering Championships in the Whitehorse area.

  • Registration is now open online
  • For more details, please see this document
  • Please note that camp registration is SEPARATE from NAOC and COC registration.

2017 Canadian Orienteering Championships

The Canada 150 Orienteering Festival in underway! The Eastern Canadian Champs, Sass Peepre National Junior Training Camp, O-Fest events, the Orienteering Canada Conference (celebrating 50 years!) and the Canadian Orienteering Champs.

Schedule:

Key links:

Media:

Pictures (if you have pictures to share, send details to communications@orienteering.ca):

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Orienteering Canada Hall of Fame

About Orienteering Canada’s Hall of Fame

The Orienteering Canada Hall of Fame was introduced in 2017, as part of Orienteering Canada’s 50th anniversary celebrations. We inducted 10 individuals as Builders in the inaugural Orienteering Canada Hall of Fame: Pat de St. Croix, Jack Forsyth, Kitty Jones, Colin Kirk, Jack Lee, Charlotte MacNaughton, Sass Peepre, Chris Skene, Patricia Skene and Jim Webster.

In January 2020, we launched our on-going Hall of Fame process, with additional categories. Nominations were due February 15, 2020. Details regarding the nomination process are here. The next opportunity to nominate individuals will be in January 2022. Nominators are encouraged to resubmit nominations for individuals who have not been selected. The quality of applicants has been extremely high.


The purpose of the Orienteering Canada Hall of Fame is to recognize and honour the individuals who have made exceptional contributions to the sport in Canada. The Orienteering Canada Hall of Fame includes the following categories:

  1. Order of Orienteering Canada (Lifetime Achievement)
    (The initial 2017 inductees are in this category. We have changed the name from the original “Builder” category).
  2. Athlete Leadership
  3. Coaching Leadership
  4. Officials Leadership
  5. Administrator Award of Distinction

Order of Orienteering Canada (Lifetime Achievement)
This category recognizes and brings attention to those who have demonstrated an extraordinary commitment to building the sport of orienteering in Canada. Individuals in this category have dedicated years of leadership service at international, national, provincial/territorial and/or the club level. Their vision, leadership and effort has made a distinct, valuable, positive and long lasting impact on Canadian orienteering.
This lifetime achievement award shall be given to individuals who have contributed to the sports heritage of Canadian orienteering for a period of not less than fifteen (15) years, although such a period of service need not necessarily be consecutive. The Order of Orienteering Canada is the highest award in Canadian orienteering.

Don Bayly / Inducted in 2020
Don’s contribution to the development and growth of orienteering in Calgary and western Canada is profound. He has been involved in orienteering in Calgary since 1979 in a wide variety of roles including athlete, mapper, event official and club Board Member. Don’s true passion in orienteering centers on map making. He made his first map (Bragg Creek Hostel) for Foothills Wanderers Orienteering Club (FWOC) in 1979 and has since made dozens of maps for all levels of competition throughout western Canada. Don is a key member of various mapping committees and also works on identifying new areas to map. Don shares his passion for mapping, organizing clinics for new mappers. In addition to his mapping work, Don volunteers regularly as an event official – from weekly training events to major international competitions, starting at the 1980 Western Canadians. He is willing to take on any role: from the mundane to the visionary. His strength lies in his understanding of orienteering and his ability to use his knowledge to help the club stage any level of event.

John Charlow / Inducted in 2020
John Charlow has been involved with orienteering in Canada since it started in 1967. As president of the St. Lawrence region of the Canada Youth Hostel Association he added orienteering to their list of activities, including making a map and holding an event in 1967 near the Bolton Glen hostel. He worked with Chris and Patricia Skene and others who formed the Montreal Orienteering Club, Quebec Orienteering Association and Canadian Orienteering Federation. In 1970 John founded the Ramblers Orienteering Club and for 47 years was the club’s mapper and main organizer of both local and major events.  In addition,  John held many special events for groups including schools and boy scouts, and was one of the first civilian coaches for the CIOR. Today, as a 90+ year old,  John continues to orienteer locally and at the Canadian Orienteering Championships, continues to organize events, and is a member of the Board of Directors of Ramblers.

Adrian Zissos (posthumous) / Inducted in 2020
Adrian’s legacy in the sport of orienteering is profound and wide-ranging and has changed the face of Canadian orienteering. Adrian tried orienteering for the first time in the mid 80s, got hooked, starting volunteering with the 1990 World Cup in Alberta and subsequently went on to organize hundreds of orienteering events, from local training events to major international events. He viewed major events as a key way to galvanize clubs, create shared goals, encourage teamwork and train officials. Adrian created the “barebones” orienteering concept of simpler orienteering events, packed full of fun. He organized 19 Barebones Orienteering Festivals over the years. Adrian’s leadership led to the Asia Pacific Orienteering Championships coming to Canada in 2002. Adrian was involved in many Canadian Orienteering Championships since the mid 2000s – in roles ranging through controller, course planner, event director, announcer, conference speaker, and more.  Adrian had the highest level of orienteering officiating; as an IOF Senior Event Advisor he officiated at many events in Canada and the US. Adrian’s favorite volunteer job was course planning and he mentored many officials over the years. He also relished the challenge of helping to develop orienteering in new areas in Canada.
As a promoter and mentor, Adrian excelled at helping newcomers to orienteering feel welcome and connected. Adrian mentored (via coaching and encouragement) many athletes along their orienteering pathway, including athletes who competed at WOC and JWOC. He organized several high level orienteers to come to Canada to coach and lecture. Adrian wrote many articles about various orienteering ideas and new ways to do things. As a skilled photographer Adrian was able to provide superb photos for promoting the sport and events; and as an added bonus he made presentations on orienteering photography, encouraging others to take better orienteering photos.
As an administrator, Adrian was involved from the club to international levels. He was President of Foothills Orienteering, was on the Board of Orienteering Alberta, was a member of many Orienteering Canada committees, most notably the High Performance Committee. In addition Adrian sat on a number of technical committees of the International Orienteering Federation and presented at several IOF conferences. Adrian was the leader behind SOGO Adventure Running, Calgary’s successful junior program that gets 1000s of kids orienteering each year.
Adrian’s overwhelming strengths in orienteering environments were embedded in his personality – conscientious, attentive to detail, kind, supportive, focus on the positive side of things, and his genuine desire to improve orienteering events, publicity and “the experience” for participants and officials. Overarching everything, his enthusiasm and leadership directly affected countless orienteering volunteers in and beyond Alberta & Canada – he inspired so many people to strive for higher club goals than they would have chosen without his encouragement.

Pat de St. Croix (posthumous) / Inducted in 2017
Pat was an advocate for women in sport, coaching and fair play. A PhysEd teacher by profession, she was instrumental in developing orienteering in the Niagara region in the 1970’s until moving to Ottawa where she continued to provide leadership and development of the sport in the National Capital area. Pat served on various orienteering boards in Ontario and nationally, including President of OC.

Jack Forsyth (posthumous) / Inducted in 2017
Jack was an instrumental leader at the OC level as a Board member for 23 years and was OC’s President. Jack was part of the initial group who founded the Manitoba Orienteering Association in 1972. Jack conceived the idea of a Western Canadian Orienteering Championships organized the first Western Canadians in Hartney in 1979. Jack organized many events, trained officials and was a mentor to many event organizers.

Kitty Jones
/ Inducted in 2017
Kitty has been involved in the annual Sass Peepre Jr Training Camp since 1985 – which helps build many of Canada’s future orienteers.  She has been the main driver for this important OC program for the last ten years. Kitty has also made a tremendous contribution over the past 33 years in Western Canada as the Alberta Orienteering Association President, club Board member, athlete, coach, mentor, mapper, official and trainer of officials.

Colin Kirk (posthumous) / Inducted in 2017
Colin served for many years as Executive Director as well as Past President of Orienteering Canada, was a key figure in building orienteering in Canada. Detailed information about Colin is available at www.orienteering.ca/2012/09/colin-kirk.

Jack Lee (posthumous) / Inducted in 2017
In 1966, Jack Lee founded the Hamilton Orienteering Association, which has grown into Canada’s largest orienteering club today (DontGetLost). Jack assisted in the development of the sport throughout North America through mapping, authoring orienteering books, race organization and organizing numerous clinics and workshops. He was a disciple of the sport for almost 50 years. In the mid 70’s he started the Hamilton Schools Adventure Run that has grown to annual participation of over 1000 students and forms the backbone of Adventure Running Kids today.

Charlotte MacNaughton / Inducted in 2017
Charlotte has been a major builder and promoter for orienteering for over 20 years, first at the club and then provincial level in Alberta before her involvement with OC. Charlotte was President of OC and served as OC’s volunteer Executive Director for a decade, rebuilding and refocusing the organization to align it with major initiatives in Canadian sport including the High Performance Program (HPP) and the Long Term Athlete Development program (LTAD).

Sass Peepre (posthumous) / Inducted in 2017
Alex “Sass” Peepre is affectionately known as the “father of orienteering” in Canada. In the mid 1960s, he introduced many of the early Canadian orienteering leaders to this new sport, organizing clinics across Ontario, the Maritimes and BC. Sass was a founder of the Ontario Orienteering Association, was involved in the early years of OC, and served as President from 1974-1976. He is remembered for his endless enthusiasm in spreading the word about orienteering, and for his dedication to leadership and youth training.

Chris and Patricia Skene / Inducted in 2017
In 1967, Chris and Patricia Skene formed the Montreal Orienteering Club and the Quebec Orienteering Association. In the same year, representing Quebec, they joined with the Ontario and Nova Scotia groups to form and incorporate the Canadian Orienteering Federation (now OC). Pat started Canada’s first orienteering newsletter and Chris made the map for the 1967 Canadian Orienteering Championships, one that was re-used 50 years later as a “re-run event” as part of the 2017 Canada 150 Orienteering Festival.

Jim Webster / Inducted in 2017
Jim has been driving force in developing the sport of orienteering in Alberta and BC for over 30 years. He has lead at the club, provincial and national levels. As the main organizer behind numerous national, continental and international major events, Jim’s superpower skill is recruiting individuals and groups to contribute to help organizationally.

Athlete Leadership
The category applies to athletes who have achieved outstanding and long term success in Canada, or as a Canadian competing abroad and who demonstrate exemplary values, both on and off the field of play. Athletes will be evaluated on their personal sport achievements and also on their contributions and the impact they have made to orienteering in their community.

Ted de St. Croix / Inducted in 2020
Ted de St. Croix is the best elite male orienteer that Canada has produced to date. As an athlete, Ted won the M21 Elite Men’s Canadian Championships fourteen times, including over 10 in a row. He has also won over 10 Canadian championships in the M35 category. To this day, Ted holds the record for Canada’s best ever performance by a male at the World Orienteering Championships. Ted placed 10th at the World Orienteering Championships in Australia in 1985. At the time, it was the best ever placing by a non-European competitor. A true pioneering result. Ted has made extensive contributions to the sport both on and off the field of play. Ted was the Technical Director of the Canadian Orienteering Federation and he wrote many of Orienteering Canada’s first coaching and officials’ manuals. He organized the Sass Peepre Junior Training Camps for many years. Ted has also served as a member of Orienteering Canada’s Board of Directors, national team coach, High Performance Committee member, Team Selection Committee member and Ted has been a key volunteer at many major events. Ted’s former teammate Kitty Jones says this about Ted: “I believe that personality, attitude and ability to cooperate as part of a team are just as important as physical and technical ability. Ted personifies the best of all these.”

Pam James / Inducted in 2020
For decades, Pam James has been consistently at the top of the results list of elite orienteering in Canada. In 1999, Pam placed 20th at the World Orienteering Championships. Pam also has at least 5 first place finishes for performances in the North American Orienteering Championships and at least 27 first place finishes at the Canadian Orienteering Championships.  Pam represented Canada at ten World Orienteering Championships from 1991-2007.  Pam also competes in ski-orienteering. She has coached for Team Canada at the World University Orienteering Championships in Spain. She is an active member of numerous Orienteering Canada committees and the Orienteering Nova Scotia Board of Directors. She has been a key official at numerous major orienteering events and Pam is also a mapper. Pam is an incredibly skilled and tough orienteer who has made an indelible mark on Canadian orienteering as an athlete, mentor and leader.

Coaching Leadership
Individuals in this category have made an outstanding contribution over a period of years as an orienteering coach and/or as a developer or instructor of Orienteering Canada’s coaching programs.

Bill Anderson / Inducted in 2020
Bill Anderson has been instrumental in the development of orienteering coaching in Canada. Bill has worked diligently with the Coaching Association of Canada to develop Orienteering Canada’s current coaching programs, specifically the Community Coach and Competition-Introduction coach training. Bill has trained many coaches across the country as a Coach Developer. In addition to his contributions to coaching, Bill has contributed significantly to orienteering as an Orienteering Canada board member (treasurer), Orienteering Quebec board member, club president (Montreal & Ottawa), major event official, and as a mapper.

Officials Leadership
Individuals in this category have made an exemplary contribution over a period of years as an official (course setter, controller and/or event director). Individuals may have also made a significant contribution as a developer or instructor of Orienteering Canada’s officials development programs and/or other technical aspects of the sport (such as: rules, event guidelines, LTAD development, etc). Outstanding Canadian mappers may also be included in this category.

Earle Phillips (posthumous) / Inducted in 2020
Earle was a Board Member of Hamilton King Foresters (HKF), Ontario Orienteering Association and a long time Canadian Orienteering Federation board member including head of Canadian National Teams in the early 90’s. Earle was a prolific Meet Director and Controller. He worked on National events numerous times, including the Canadian Championships in 1975, 1978, 1983, 1986, 1994 and 2013, the 1978 Canadian 6-day, and the 1994 and 2006 North American Championships. He was the driving force for HKF to host Canada’s first ever World Cup in 1986. Earle was one of the driving forces behind the development of Orienteering Canada’s Officials’ Certification program that still exists today. Earle was well known as an outstanding controller, with an impressive attention to detail. He encouraged other volunteers to deliver the highest quality events possible.

Malcolm Adams (posthumous) / Inducted in 2020
Malcolm started orienteering in the early 1970’s as a leading member of the Viking Club. Malcolm developed into one of the best mappers in North America. He was a member of the Canadian Orienteering Federation (COF) Map Committee that developed the COF ‘Orienteering Mapping Manual’ and served as Map Committee chairperson. He started in the early days of colour maps, but was one of the early adopters of OCAD and taught many others how to use mapping software to produce better maps. His maps were for Canadian Champs and World Cups. He was a controller for numerous major events as well. “No one had a better feel for mapping vegetation than Malcolm.”

Administrator of Award of Distinction
Individuals in this category have made a significant contribution to the growth and development of the sport with their orienteering club or provincial/territorial orienteering association or at the  national level. They have made a significant contribution to developing orienteering as a Board member, program developer, innovative promoter of orienteering, etc. They have been a difference maker. 

Margaret James / Inducted in 2020
Margie James has been one of the leading members of developing Orienteering not only in Nova Scotia, but in Canada as well. She has been President of the Orienteering Association of Nova Scotia (OANS), President of the Canadian Orienteering Federation (COF) and she played a key role in the establishment of the national office of the COF in Ottawa. As President of the COF, Margie was instrumental in setting up the structure of many productive COF committees. Margie was key in assisting Nova Scotia to host the 1977 Canadian Orienteering Championships in Wentworth, the first outside of central Canada. She helped plan the first National Planning Conference in Ottawa in 1977. She was the first Canadian to attend the International Orienteering Federation (IOF) Congress in Tampere Finland in 1979. Margie was also a Director of the Sports Federation of Canada.

Gord Hunter / Inducted in 2020
Gord has been a mover and shaker in Canadian orienteering since the late 1960s. He was a founding member of Ottawa Orienteering Club in 1969 and has since been a member of the Board of Directors of the Ottawa Orienteering Club, Orienteering Quebec, and Orienteering Canada.  He is one of very few Canadians to be a member of the International Orienteering Federation Council. Gord has done a great job in bringing profile to the sport. As an event organizer and mapper, Gord headed up the High Schools Orienteering Championships in Ottawa in the 70s and 80s which brought a number of people into the sport who then became key members of Canada’s elite orienteering scene. He has created maps for schools, camps and for local and national competitions. Gord has been involved in major Canadian orienteering events since the 1970s, including Canada’s first international event in 1976, the O’Ring Quebec 5-Day. As an athlete, Gord was a member of Canada’s National Team in the 1970s, including being a member of the 8th place WOC relay team in 1978, still best ever for Canada. He continues to compete in his age group nationally and internationally. Gord’s enthusiasm for orienteering has brought many people into the sport as both participants and volunteers.

__

2020 Hall of Fame Selection Committee:  Kitty Jones, Barbara Scheck, Jim Blanchard

2017 Hall of Fame Selection Committee:  Pam James, Marg Ellis, Mike Waddington, Marion Owen, Tracy Bradley and Anne Teutsch

Save

Save

Save